.:anatomy of a pocket cloth diaper:.

While there are multitudes of styles of cloth diapers be they velcro, snapped, adjustable, all in one, or a combination of all, we are particularly partial to pocket cloth diapers. In our estimation, these are the easiest to use, the easiest to wash and dry.

Pocket cloth diapers consist of three main components: an outer, waterproof layer – commonly made of polyurethane laminate (known as PUL), a lining material – often cottons, hemps, bamboos or microfleece, and inserts.

PUL fabric is manufactured by laminating knit fabric to a film of polyurethane. This creates a flexible material that keeps wetness in while allowing the diaper to breathe.

The diaper lining is the only part of the diaper that comes in direct contact with a baby’s skin and therefore is chosen for comfort and the ability to direct and wick wetness effectively.

Inserts are one of the most important components of a cloth diaper as they are responsible for absorbing and holding the wet. A cloth diaper’s performance is heavily dependant on the capability of the insert inside it.

Diapers are fastened either with snaps or specialty velcro.

Fresh Bum Pocket Cloth Diaper Anatomy | Ticklepenny Corner

.:how they work:.

A cloth diaper, when fitted snugly and properly, works as one would imagine: the leg and back elastics act to prevent leaking, the lining directs the wet to the insert which absorbs it until a change is required.

.:assembling a pocket diaper:.

Putting a pocket diaper together is simple, though for the first several times it can feel a bit awkward. Diaper inserts generally perform best when more than one is used. This ensures that wetness is better contained and prolongs time between changes.

Two inserts are stacked one on top of the other [in the case of Fresh Bum’s directives, towel insert on top of microfibre] and pushed into the back pocket of the diaper.

Cloth diaper assembly figure 1 | Ticklepenny Corner

a) place the diaper, lining side up on your thigh or on a table in front of you.

Cloth diaper assembly figure 2 | Ticklepenny Corner

b) hold the two inserts firmly, push them into the pocket.

Cloth diaper assembly figure 3 | Ticklepenny Corner

c) as far forward as possible.

Cloth diaper assembly figure 4 | Ticklepenny Corner

d) grip them firmly on the outside with your free hand.

Cloth diaper assembly figure 5 | Ticklepenny Corner

e) use the hand currently inside the diaper to smooth the inserts flat and to realign them if necessary.

Cloth diaper assembly figure 6 | Ticklepenny Corner

f) do a final alignment check to make sure inserts are positioned correctly.

Cloth diaper assembly figure 7 | Ticklepenny Corner

g) stuffed and ready to go.

 

 

.:fitting:.

Fitting a cloth diaper on a baby can take a bit of finesse, especially if you’ve got an active, extremely curious one. Speed therefore, will inevitably become a skill quickly learned as will the controlling and wrangling of limbs.

Fitting cloth diaper on baby | Ticklepenny Corner

a) place the diaper lining side up with the winged end positioned near the baby’s waist – fold the front up and hold it in place.

Fitting cloth diaper on baby | Ticklepenny Corner

b) grab a wing and fit the outermost snap to the adjustment that fits your baby.

Fitting cloth diaper on baby | Ticklepenny Corner

c) repeat with the opposite wing, securing all three snaps. Return to the previous wing and secure remaining two snaps.

Fitting cloth diaper on baby | Ticklepenny Corner

d) run fingers around leg elastics to ensure they are lying flat and taught.

Fitting cloth diaper on baby  | Ticklepenny Corner

e) adjust the inserts by flipping baby over, reaching into the pocket and tugging the inserts up until an equal amount of insert is covering the front and back. As you can see, at this point, our baby always makes a run for it…

Fitting cloth diaper on baby | Ticklepenny Corner

f) arrange diaper back, easing up over arranged inserts ensuring the pocket openings are aligned.

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